Estimated reading time: 4 minutes, 8 seconds

Tortoise & The Hare

Tortoise & The Hare

My staff is used to getting dogged about how fast, (or not) things are getting done, that anxious impatience is a normal reaction to the excitement of upgraded living spaces, it is also the sign that a schedule is, or is not being followed. As a contractor, I am keeping one ear to the ground at all times.

Setting expectations is a very important feature of a professional remodeler. The schedule is king and as timelines get bumped for a myriad of reasons, it takes a magician to pull projects together.

Nothing is going to make a client more exhausted as a drawn-out project. Sure things come up and we adjust and adapt to deal with inclement weather, illness in the ranks, supply chain shortages, and all sorts of unexpected issues. That is just what comes with the territory. Fortunately, that is our problem, not yours. We occasionally fall victim to the unavoidable delay. It is our job to not let our problems affect “The show” as it were.

We are currently a victim of the booming economy and backlogs. It sucks, but we are stuck too. The most important thing to do is to communicate.

The “It” We Sell is Going To:

  • Take a little longer than you think it should.
  • The “It” we sell will cost a little more because we are creating quality workmanship and raw material prices are on a meteoric rise.
  • The “It” we sell is going to be great and last longer than the other “It” you didn’t buy.

So why is the mismatch so prevalent? I believe it is because there is a transition to a new way of doing things.

The New Vision of Production

My new vision of production is revolutionary for everyone on the team, so it will take a bit to sink in. The new model is based upon a symphony. Yes, I used to play the violin and I recall being amazed at how a song came together when all the instruments on stage together lead by Dr. Sophier.

If everyone is playing randomly it sounds like crap. Once the conductor arrived it all came together in beautiful music. Everyone on stage has something to contribute, knowing when and keeping the tempo is crucial. As much as I enjoy jazz, that is no longer the model I choose to adopt.

Orchestra music

The Project is The Song

In the orchestra there is a sheet of music, call it the Plans, Schedule, and the Description of Work all wrapped up into one document. Everyone knows what they need to play and how to play their own instrument and have a general idea of when.

The conductor has his back to the audience, they are concentrated on the music and each player in the orchestra. The conductor keeps everyone on track with encouragement and enthusiasm. Having everyone under the control of the conductor brings the group together. Sure there is a solo now and again but the emphasis is on the group.

The relationship is built on trust and rehearsals where the bugs are worked out. The conductor is responsible for knowing all the music inside and out. They also have complete focus and know what the finished product should sound like and what the composer had in mind when he piece was written.

My Tile Shower is Taking so Long

I recall my frustration when I remodeled my own home. My tile shower was taking so long to construct. I recall checking it nightly after work, I would see incremental progress but was disa[pointed with how long it was taking. Turns out I had no idea what it took to create a beautiful tile shower. Sure I wanted a great shower. What I realized is that I was imposing my uneducated timeline on the craftsman who was doing the work.

Had I Asked, He Would Have Told Me! Would I Have Listened?

  • Did I put unnecessary pressure on the craftsman? Hell yes.
  • Did it make the job go any faster? I doubt it.
  • Do I love my shower 20 years after having used it every day? Hell yes.
  • Did the time it took to do the work property and great hurt me? No.
  • Do I begrudge the extra few days? NO! 
  • In the big picture, it was a moment in time, that I respect and admire daily.

Your comments are welcome. To ask questions or get more information about remodeling, click here to email me directly, or call 208-947-7261

If you or someone you know is considering remodeling or just wants to speak to a trustworthy remodeling contractor, please contact me. You’ll be glad you did.

Disclaimer: Some of these images came from the WEB. If they are yours, and you object to them being used, please claim them and I will gladly remove and replace them at once.